Obama Campaign

The 2012 presidential election looked like it would be decided by middle-class Ohio voters. We joined a consortium of companies organized by Obama/Biden campaign advisor Paul Begala. An anonymous production company, a Hollywood director with several box-office mega-hits and O-Arms were brought together to create films under Begala’s Super PAC Priorities USA Action to influence undecided voters in the critical swing state. Each of the films used comedy to reveal the dire consequences Mitt Romney’s proposed budget plan would have on middle-class education and health care. To influence undecided voters in the swing state, we helped create comedic films that revealed the consequences that Mitt Romney's proposed budget plan would have on middle-class education and health care.

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Somewhere along the way, we unearthed from our archive (right) this rally placard that Libby designed. Libby designed pieces of Bill Clinton’s identity for the Democratic National Convention '92 held in Madison Square Garden. This vertical rally placard was executed, approved by the DNC and printed in about 48 hours, if we're recalling correctly. We worked with Donny Deutsch, who was brought on as a media advisor for the Clinton/Gore campaign.

The placards were popular (photos below) because they were tall and easy to heft upward amidst a wild, gesticulating crowd. The typeface was a reissued version from a wood-block press type of the 19th century. This bold, antique font balanced the super modern typefaces on the rally floor, projecting classic values and strong Americana to the television audience.

That wasn’t our first time dipping into politics. In 1992, we designed rally cards for Bill Clinton’s presidential run. The vertical placard was designed, approved by the Democratic National Convention, and printed in under 48 hours. The placards were tall and easy to heft amidst the crowd. The antique font balanced the modern typefaces on the rally floor, projecting classic Americana values to the television audience.

Meanwhile, we were printing agitating street art, silk-screening fly posters (left) in our studio and wheat-pasting them all over lower Manhattan in the evenings. The Gulf Oil logo iconically represented Big Oil interests in those days. We tweaked the logo to remind people that as bad as Saddam Hussein was, we were quite possibly embracing war to protect fossil-fuel consumption as there were a number of human-rights tragedies around the world that received no support from the US and its allies. Just food for thought.

Meanwhile, we were silk-screening posters in our studio and wheat-pasting them all over lower Manhattan. In those days, the Gulf Oil logo iconically represented the interests of Big Oil. We tweaked the logo to allude to likeliness that the US was embracing war in the Middle East to guard fuel resources.